About Us

A B O U T

Combining state-of-the-art functional neuroimaging techniques, computational tools, and behavioural methods, the Laboratory of Neuropsychology & Human Neuroscience aims to build and promote a more comprehensive understanding of neurocognitive and affective mechanisms underpinning human behaviour.

We are a part of the Department of Psychology at the University of Hong Kong. We are also affiliated with the State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Over the years, the Lab has focused on research themes related to neuroplasticity, healthy ageing, and affective regulation. 

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T E A M

Directed by Professor Tatia Lee, our lab consists of a diverse mix of research assistant professors, postdoctoral fellows, and research postgraduate students. 

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R E S E A R C H

The Laboratory of Neuropsychology and Human Neuroscience’s research focuses on (1) what and how experiences induce beneficial neuroplastic changes, and (2) the neurocognitive and neuro-affective underpinnings of functions that define the human nature of an individual.

The goal of our Lab is to create knowledge that contributes to promoting brain health and psychological health.

Neuroplasticity (otherwise known as neural or brain plasticity) is the ability of neural networks in the brain to change according to experiences. These experience-induced changes range from the generation and modification of synapses, to larger-scale adjustments in cortical remapping and functional reorganization.

In our Lab, we examine how experiences lead to structural-functional changes of the brain affecting behaviors.

Neuro-cognitive and -affective processes underpin cognitive and affective regulation.

Our Lab utilizes social-cognitive-affective principles to understand a range of everyday phenomena. We also investigate processes that have undergone pathological changes leading to cognitive and/or affective dysregulation in clinical populations.

The brain is a vital organ that coordinates thoughts and feelings to produce an integral sense of self and psychological well-being. However, our brain health can be challenged by natural processes such as aging, or in cases of trauma and neurodegenerative conditions.

Our Lab utilizes lesion studies and other methodologies to understand the impacts of ageing and trauma on our neurocognitive and neuro-affective functioning.

The World Health Organization defines psychological health as a state of well-being in which an individual realizes their potential, can cope with daily stressors effectively, work productively, and contribute to their community fruitfully. Yet stress has become an inevitable component of our daily living, accompanied by an escalating sense of loneliness among people from all walks of life. How do such issues affect our psychological health?

Our Lab’s research on psychological health examines stress, loneliness, depression, and resilience.

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